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Bifold Doors: Your Frequently Asked Questions – Answered!

If you're thinking of buying a set of bifold doors, no doubt you'll have a few questions before you make your purchase. Here we'll be addressing all of the most common door faqs that arise when it comes to bifold doors. Most of your general queries or issues regarding internal and external bifold doors should be solved below. Of course, this is a subject ripe with potential variables that we can't possibly predict, so there's every chance that your situation might prove unique. If this is the case, we'd advise you get in touch with a professional, who might be able to help you with your queries, because if you try to fix a problem you don't fully understand, chances are you'll only end up making it worse. We have experts on hand at our door showroom, so you can always arrange a visit and speak to a professional. If you think your question or issue is more common, however, then read on!

How Secure are Bifold Doors?

In short, bi-fold doors can be very secure. The glass used is toughened safety glass and all systems come with a multi-point locking system for added security. Find out more about bifold door security in our detailed article.

What Bifold Door Sizes do you Offer?

Most bifold doors come in standard sizes that will be suitable for the door openings in a wide variety of homes. Take a look at our bifold door sizing guide to read all about the standard sizes available.

If a standard size simply won't work for your property then we do offer made to measure doors and windows, so get in touch for a quote.

Are Bifold Doors Thermally Efficient?

Yes! Bifold doors are most certainly thermally efficient. Timber bifolds are often made with an engineered core that helps to minimise heat transfer, and aluminium options include a thermal break which stops the material passing heat straight through. The glazed units are also filled with argon to improve thermal efficiency. Read more about bifold door weather resistance and thermal efficiency in our full article.  

What is a Traffic Door?

A traffic door is a single panel that operates separately to the bifold door system. Usually, bi folds slide in pairs so an uneven number usually results in a traffic door. These can be really useful for quick access between rooms or in and out of the house, as you don't have to operate the whole sliding system unless you choose to.

Are Timber, Aluminium or UPVC Bifold Doors Best?

The answer depends on what you're looking for. There are benefits to each material but we'd strongly recommend timber or aluminium. If you're wondering which bifold doors are best for you, check out our detailed guide where we compare the pros and cons of each material.

What Colours do Bifold Doors Come in?

Our bifold doors are available in white, grey, and natural wood. Whilst these colour options might seem limited, you don't have to choose a fully finished bi folding door for your home. If you select an unfinished or white primed door, it's ready to have the top coat of your choice applied. This means that you can paint it to the colour your heart desires as long as you can find a suitable paint!

The exception to this rule is the aluminium bifold door. It's usually been finished with a powder coating that adheres and finishes the metal professionally - something that is best done in the factory.

Are Bifold Doors Easy to Clean?

Cleaning bifold doors is as simple as cleaning your windows. A clean every now and then will help to increase the life of your doors. Find out exactly how to get the best finish in our guide on how to clean bifold doors.

Will I Need Planning Permission for Bifold Doors?

If you are replacing existing doors, you won't usually need planning permission to add bifold doors. However, if you live in a conservation area you may need to get further information from your local council before going ahead.

If you plan to build an extension and add bifold doors it's always best to check local building regulations before you start work.

Will Bifold Doors Add Value to my Property?

Bifold doors help light to filter through your home and open up space. This generally makes your home look more desirable which can add value when you come to sell. Easy access to a well-kept garden or patio area is also a great selling point that will help potential buyers see your property in a positive light.

What Glazing is used for Bifold Doors?

All our bifold doors are double glazed for maximum insulation. Each glazed unit in our external bifold doors is made from toughened safety glass which has increased strength compared with normal glass. If this glass experiences enough stress to break (which is rare) it will crumble into small chunks which are much less likely to cause injury than the shards or splinters created by normal glass. You can find out more about bifold door glazing in our full-length article. Clear and frosted glazing options are available on most of our folding doors.

What Guarantees are Offered on your Bifold Doors?

Just like all the doors on our site, our bi fold doors are sold with a 10-year guarantee against manufacturing faults. You can find out more about the guarantees we offer on our information page so make sure you take a look at the full details.

How Long will my Bifolding Doors Take to Arrive?

We offer delivery to most UK mainland addresses in just 72 hours.

Why Won’t my Bifold Doors Close, Stay Closed or Close all the Way?

There are a variety of potential issues you might experience with bifold doors. You might be wondering why won't bifold doors stay closed, or be confused when your bifold door won't close all the way. OK. If your bifold doors won't close that's a pretty serious problem. I mean, what good is a door that doesn't close? Don't panic though, as the cause and subsequent fix is often a lot simpler than you'd think. Of course, before you get your toolkit out and start taking things apart, it's important that you look at some simple causes that can be fixed without getting messy. If the bifold door in question is inside, for example, in a wardrobe, have you checked the carpet? If it's bunched up around the door it could simply have got into the tracking system. It could also be simply that the metal parts of the mechanism have become rusty, and require a bit of lubrication to help them work properly again. This is particularly common in exterior bifold doors.

If there's a more serious issue, and your bifold door won't close smoothly or tends to scrape and get stuck, it's more than likely that your door is out of alignment with the door frame. If this is indeed the case, the fix is surprisingly simple, and will only take around 10 minutes as long as you have a smidgen of DIY experience and the right tools. First, close your doors and trace the edges to make sure they line up with the frame. Even if they are off by a little bit the door will be stubborn, so you'll have to make some changes.

The most common problem is that the top pivot and bracket have become loose, allowing the door to slip out. If this is the case, open the door and loosen the top pivot bracket with a screwdriver. Next, slide the bracket in the track until the door and jamb are parallel and then retighten the set screw in the bracket. You might have to do this a few times until you get it just right, but once you do, you shouldn't have any more problems. If the problem is that the door is binding against the lower part of the frame, you might have a problem with the bottom pivot. To fix this, simply raise the door to shift the pivot in or out. If this doesn't work, there might be some parts that need fixing or replacing, in which case we'd recommend you do a little more research, as it's not a particularly easy job!

Do my Bifold Doors Need a Bottom Track?

The short answer to this question is a definitive no, but we'll explain. It's a common misconception that a bottom track is required with bifold doors, but it's perfectly possible to install a bifold door without one. It's widely believed that the bottom track supports the weight of the doors themselves and keeps them aligned, but that's not necessarily the case. Indeed, you'll rarely see bottom rolling tracks on wooden or plastic bifold doors, though they are common on metal doors. By installing bifold doors without them, and instead relying on a top-hung system, you'll actually get a much smoother fold-out with significantly greater flexibility, which will ensure your bifold doors fit perfectly with no planning required. Most modern bi-fold doors tend to use an angle bracket that is normally screwed to the wall and floor, and then a pivot pin fits into that. Bottom rails are simply not required. At least not unless your doors are particularly heavy! Find out more about bifold door tracks here.

What is a Low Bifold Door Threshold?

A bifold door with a low threshold gives you flush levels between adjoining floor areas. This can be used for internal bifold doors which are installed as room dividers or placed between your house and conservatory. A standard threshold is recommended for external bifold doors to allow a weather seal to be created.

Which Lintel Should I Use For my Bifold Doors?

If your bifold doors are exterior doors, you will need a concrete, wooden or steel cavity lintel for horizontal support. Which you decide to use will depend largely on the thickness of your walls and the size of the opening in which you'll be installing your bifold doors. As a rule of thumb, lintels must have at least 150mm bearing at each end, and the overall length of a lintel should at least be the sum of the opening width plus 300mm. The safe working load for the lintel must also not be exceeded by the combined loads imposed by the structure. This is a lot of sums to take into account, but if you're looking at installing your own bifold doors, you probably have a rough idea already, and if not, you'll probably be looking at hiring a professional who knows what they're doing! Either way, steel is generally the best way to go in most cases, as steel lintels can be cut to suit just about any wall thickness or situation. Steel lintels also provide a good base for a cavity tray.

So there you have it. If you still have any questions regarding your bifold doors, or anything related to bi fold doors, there are plenty of outlets available online brimming with professional expertise. If we've managed to help you though, we hope you enjoy your bifold doors. In our opinion, there really is no better way to bring a little life (and often convenience) to your home!